Brokeback Mountain Forum
   Zur Startseite Registrierung Bilder Mitgliederliste Kalender Suche Häufig gestellte Fragen
Brokeback Mountain Forum » Schauspieler » Andere Schauspieler » Roberta Maxwell (Jack's Mutter) » Hallo Gast [Anmelden|Registrieren]
Letzter Beitrag | Erster ungelesener Beitrag Druckvorschau | Thema zu Favoriten hinzufügen
Seiten (2): « vorherige 1 [2] Neues Thema erstellen Antwort erstellen
Zum Ende der Seite springen Roberta Maxwell (Jack's Mutter)
Autor
Beitrag « Vorheriges Thema | Nächstes Thema »

Andi Andi ist weiblich
Ranchbesitzer


images/avatars/avatar-983.jpg

Dabei seit: 20.06.2008
Beiträge: 10.358

Level: 59 [?]
Erfahrungspunkte: 44.224.058
Nächster Level: 47.989.448

3.765.390 Erfahrungspunkt(e) für den nächsten Levelanstieg

Auf diesen Beitrag antworten Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       Zum Anfang der Seite springen

@ Frank
Dito! smile
22.02.2007 10:55 Andi ist offline Beiträge von Andi suchen Nehmen Sie Andi in Ihre Freundesliste auf

Uschi Administrator Uschi ist weiblich
Administrator


images/avatars/avatar-949.jpg

Dabei seit: 04.06.2007
Beiträge: 13.783

Level: 61 [?]
Erfahrungspunkte: 64.108.616
Nächster Level: 64.602.553

493.937 Erfahrungspunkt(e) für den nächsten Levelanstieg

Auf diesen Beitrag antworten Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       Zum Anfang der Seite springen

ich sehe gerade "Warehouse 13" und habe eine Weile gebraucht, bis ich Roberta Maxwell erkannt habe.

Und in ihrer Rolle trauert sie auch um einen Jack



Quelle

__________________
"When I get sad, I stop being sad and be awesome instead. True story."
(Barney Stinson)
18.05.2011 20:56 Uschi ist offline E-Mail an Uschi senden Beiträge von Uschi suchen Nehmen Sie Uschi in Ihre Freundesliste auf

wilderness wilderness ist weiblich
Ranchbesitzer


images/avatars/avatar-803.jpg

Dabei seit: 27.06.2008
Beiträge: 2.207
Herkunft: Deutschland

Level: 49 [?]
Erfahrungspunkte: 9.408.816
Nächster Level: 10.000.000

591.184 Erfahrungspunkt(e) für den nächsten Levelanstieg

Auf diesen Beitrag antworten Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Zitat:
Original von Uschi
ich sehe gerade "Warehouse 13" und habe eine Weile gebraucht, bis ich Roberta Maxwell erkannt habe.

Und in ihrer Rolle trauert sie auch um einen Jack



Quelle



ganz ehrlich - ich hätte sie wohl gar nicht erkannt!

Du hast echt gute Augen, liebe Uschi. wink

__________________
Unser Feuer ist eine kleine warme Insel in der Nacht. Funken steigen auf und verglühen auf ihrem Weg zu den Sternen.Marlene Röder - "Zebraland"

18.05.2011 22:44 wilderness ist offline E-Mail an wilderness senden Beiträge von wilderness suchen Nehmen Sie wilderness in Ihre Freundesliste auf

AngLee Super Moderator AngLee ist weiblich


images/avatars/avatar-1076.png

Dabei seit: 20.06.2008
Beiträge: 15.248

Level: 62 [?]
Erfahrungspunkte: 65.105.006
Nächster Level: 74.818.307

9.713.301 Erfahrungspunkt(e) für den nächsten Levelanstieg

Auf diesen Beitrag antworten Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Die Bilder daraus hatten wir hier schon mal, aber ich bin heute noch mal über diesen schon älteren Artikel aus "Hollywood elsewere" gestolpert, über Roberta Maxwell und ihre Rolle als Jacks Mutter in Brokeback Mountain:

Depth of Feeling
(etwas nach unten scrollen)

Zitat:

In real life Roberta Maxwell, the gifted New York actress who’s quietly riveting as Jake Gyllenhaal’s bereaved mom during a four- or five-minute scene near the finale of Brokeback Mountain, barely resembles her emotionally bruised, hardscrabble character.

Her face is pale and plain and vaguely trembling in Ang Lee’s film, and with short, sort-of-mousey red hair. Very much a cowering but compassionate farmer’s wife from Wyoming. But the woman who opened her apartment door at 6 pm on New Year’s Eve was a pert and sophisticated New Yorker in glasses, her blondish-gray hair cut even shorter and her eyes the opposite of morose.

Roberta Maxwell during the second-to-last scene in Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain

Imagine that! An actress who can not only manipulate her appearance but do a little internal tossing of the emotional salad.

Maxwell isn’t the only Brokeback Mountain actress who supplies a strong dose of hurt — there’s also the excellent Kate Mara and Linda Cardellini as Heath Ledger’s daughter and jilted girlfriend, respectively, on top of Michelle Williams and Anne Hathaway’s lead performances as unhappy wives — but Maxwell makes her mark in what is arguably the film’s penultimate scene.

It’s obvious that Maxwell’s mom and her scowling homophobic husband (played by the great Peter McRobbie) know what kind of relationship Ledger’s Ennis del Mar had with their son Jack, but her grief-ridden face is full of acceptance and compas- sion when del Mar pays a visit. And all of this hemmed in by fear of her husband’s rattlesnake temperament.
It’s the quiet but devastating interplay between Maxwell, McRobbie and Ledger that increases the film’s sadness to peak strength and sets up the film’s final hit, which comes when Mara tells Ledger she’s getting married to an oil-field worker named Kurt, and then leaves him alone in his trailer with Jack’s shirt hanging in the closet.

In fact, the more you watch Maxwell’s scene (I have a DVD screener of the film), the more clear it becomes that her underperforming of this exquisitely shot denouement is the emotional springboard of that last ten- or twelve-minute section. She’s got the whole film in her eyes.


Snapped about six hours before midnight in Maxwell’s Manhattan apartment — 12.31.05, 6:15 pm

And she had only a few hours to make it work.

Maxwell shot her footage in July 2004, not on a set but inside the rundown farm- house seen in the film, which is located about an hour outside Calgary, Alberta, which was a cheaper place to shoot than Wyoming, where most of the film’s story unfolds.

“When I arrived at the set, people were getting ready to leave,” she recalls. “It was the very end of the shoot.”

Jack’s mom is “a lifelong Pentecostal Christian,” says Maxwell. “And in this last scene we see this tension and fear about what she knows her husband feels about this relationship, and about great cruelty and suffering she has endured herself, but she shows compassion to Ennis because she can see Jack was obviously very much loved.”

Maxwell suspects that Brokeback Mountain‘s casting director Avy Kaufman arranged a meeting with director Ang Lee a few months earlier because she had played the mother of Sean Penn’s condemned prisoner in Dead Man Walking (’95) and “so I have a history of sad mothers.”

She sensed during her sit-down with Lee that “we had connected on a level that would make me a very strong competitor [for the part].”

Maxwell, Len Cariou and director Ethan McSweeny during a promotional stint on behalf of a relatively recent Pace University production of “The Persians.”

Brokeback Mountain had been showing to industry and festival audiences since early September, but Maxwell didn’t see it until it opened commercially on December 9th.

“I was really shocked by the scene, by our scene,” she recalls. “The starkness of it…the simplicity. And how [Lee] shot it, like when I put my hand on Heath’s shoul- der. I grabbed my friend sitting next to me. It was so strange, this old hand…I said to myself, is that mine?”

Maxwell began as a child actor in the ’50s, and has done lots of New York theatre, television, TV movies and features.
Her Dead Man Walking performance was, if you ask me, the big standout before Brokeback Mountain. She played the judge in Jonathan Demme’s Philadelphia (i.e., the one administering when Tom Hanks collapsed in court). And she had the lead female role in the 1975 debut stage production of Peter Shaffer’s Equus with costars Anthony Hopkins and Peter Firth. (That’s right…the naked-in-the-stables role.)

Maxwell was told in early October that her performance was special by none other than Annie Proulx, the author of the “Brokeback Mountain” short story that Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana’s screenplay is so closely based upon. The advance review came in the form of a letter, and it brought Maxwell to tears.

Sometime around ’76 or ’77

It reads: “Dear Roberta Maxwell — Just the right touch…the almost-crushed wife of a martinette who under his very nose and in only a few lines about cake and coffee, gets across the message that she knew and understood what Jack meant to Ennis. I don’t know how you did it in so small a compass. With much apprecia- tion, Annie Proulx.”

Maxwell read this to me aloud near the end of our talk. Here’s a recording of about half of it.
She asked last night how I think Brokeback Mountain will do at the Oscars, and when I repeated the conventional wisdom that it’s the Best Picture front-runner, she feigned surprise. I would play it that way if I were her.

Maxwell told the Toronto Star‘s Martin Knelman that she’ll be visiting Los Angeles soon “so I can enjoy the fun of Brokeback being touted for the Oscars. It’s such a special time and such a special film. Why not enjoy it while it lasts?”

If it were my call (and I can’t imagine Focus Features not feeling the same way), Maxwell will wind up sitting next to her costars and Lee and the film’s producer James Schamus and all the others at the Oscar Awards. If there’s anyone apart from the core players who deserves such an honor, it’s Maxwell.

I mean, c’mon, she’s the ninth-inning pinch hitter…the windup, the pitch…thwack!

January 4, 2006 5:45 pm
by admin

Besonders berührt mich die Aussage in der markierten Stelle:
Dass Maxwell Jacks Mutter so spielt, dass sie versteht, welche Beziehung Ennis zu Jack hatte.
Dass sie sich in diesem Spannungsfeld der Homophobie ihres Mannes bewegt,
Dass es das ruhige, aber zerstörerische Zusammenspiel von Maxwell, McRobbie und Ledger ist, das die Traurigkeit des Films auf die Spitze treibt und den finalen Schlag des Films aufbaut, in dem Ennis von der Heirat seiner Tochter erfährt und diese ihn schließlich im Trailer mit den zwei Hemden im Schrank zurücklässt.

Und, dass Maxwells reduzierte Spielweise und der Schnitt das emotionale Sprungbrett bilden für die Schluss Minuten des Films.

"She’s got the whole film in her eyes".

So hatte ich das noch nie betrachtet.
10.05.2017 00:30 AngLee ist offline E-Mail an AngLee senden Beiträge von AngLee suchen Nehmen Sie AngLee in Ihre Freundesliste auf

lundi96 lundi96 ist weiblich
Ranchbesitzer


images/avatars/avatar-956.png

Dabei seit: 14.02.2008
Beiträge: 4.924
Herkunft: Rheydt

Level: 54 [?]
Erfahrungspunkte: 21.648.354
Nächster Level: 22.308.442

660.088 Erfahrungspunkt(e) für den nächsten Levelanstieg

Auf diesen Beitrag antworten Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Ein toller Artikel und kann jedes Wort unterstreichen. Unglaublich auch wie anders sie in ihrem normalen Leben aussieht, ich hätte sie nie als Jacks Mutter erkannt.

Wahnsinn auch wie viel Arbeit das Casten ist, denn man muss ja für jede auch noch so kleine Rolle casten, wie z.B. die Pöbler bei dem Feuerwerk oder Cassies neuen Freund Carl, den Basken etc.

__________________
Life hands you lemons then sell lemonade,
it´s the choice we make.

10.05.2017 11:16 lundi96 ist offline E-Mail an lundi96 senden Beiträge von lundi96 suchen Nehmen Sie lundi96 in Ihre Freundesliste auf

helga helga ist weiblich
Ranchbesitzer


images/avatars/avatar-1059.gif

Dabei seit: 20.05.2007
Beiträge: 12.796
Herkunft: Frankfurt/Main

Level: 61 [?]
Erfahrungspunkte: 59.714.264
Nächster Level: 64.602.553

4.888.289 Erfahrungspunkt(e) für den nächsten Levelanstieg

Auf diesen Beitrag antworten Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Ich schließe mich auch an smile

__________________
Man sieht nur mit dem Herzen gut. Das Wesentliche ist für Augen unsichtbar .

( Antoine de Saint-Exupery )
10.05.2017 11:45 helga ist offline E-Mail an helga senden Beiträge von helga suchen Nehmen Sie helga in Ihre Freundesliste auf

AngLee Super Moderator AngLee ist weiblich


images/avatars/avatar-1076.png

Dabei seit: 20.06.2008
Beiträge: 15.248

Level: 62 [?]
Erfahrungspunkte: 65.105.006
Nächster Level: 74.818.307

9.713.301 Erfahrungspunkt(e) für den nächsten Levelanstieg

Auf diesen Beitrag antworten Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Zitat:
Original von lundi96
Wahnsinn auch wie viel Arbeit das Casten ist, denn man muss ja für jede auch noch so kleine Rolle casten, wie z.B. die Pöbler bei dem Feuerwerk oder Cassies neuen Freund Carl, den Basken etc.

Das habe ich auch gedacht.
Man muss ja ständig eine Vision der Endfassung im Kopf haben und gleichzeitig das Potential in den Schauspielern sehen.
Da müssen die Casting Leute ein unheimlich feines Gespür haben bei Aussehen, Persönlichkeit und Ausdrucksvermögen der Bewerber.
10.05.2017 13:27 AngLee ist offline E-Mail an AngLee senden Beiträge von AngLee suchen Nehmen Sie AngLee in Ihre Freundesliste auf

Seiten (2): « vorherige 1 [2] Baumstruktur | Brettstruktur
Gehe zu:
Neues Thema erstellen Antwort erstellen
Brokeback Mountain Forum » Schauspieler » Andere Schauspieler » Roberta Maxwell (Jack's Mutter)

Impressum

Forensoftware: Burning Board, entwickelt von WoltLab GmbH